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Programming language: Haskell
License: BSD 3-clause "New" or "Revised" License
Tags: DSL    
Latest version: v0.1.1.0

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README

Portager - DSL for configuring Gentoo's Portage

Portager is here to help you maintain your Gentoo's Portage configuration sane.

Usage

Import Portager and run portager in your main function. It accepts two parameters:

  • a configuration (currently contains only selected architecture - e.g. amd64)
  • a list of PortageR PackageSets. The type is as complex as it is in order to push down the sequencing down to the library function.

Example Project

See example/README.md for an example of a full project.

Motivation and Examples

Everyting in One File

If I want to install a package with changes to use flags and keywords, I have to add it to a set, amend package.use and amend package.accept_keywords. Three files to be changed just to install something non-standard (which is fairly standard on Gentoo).

Changes of Useflags, Keywords for Dependencies

Taking Inkcape as an example of an atom, that requires some adjustments to use flags of packages it depends on.

Portager allows you to track those changes right where you define that you request Inkscape to be installed. If you ever decide to get rid of it, you might as well want to get rid of changes to its dependencies.

Having following complete Portager configuration:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Portager

inkscape :: PortageR Package
inkscape = "media-gfx/inkscape" `with` do
               use [ "exif", "imagemagick" ]
               dep [ "app-text/poppler" `with` do
                       use [ "cairo" ]
                       dep [ "media-libs/libpng" `with` unstable ]
                   , "dev-python/pillow" `with` use [ "jpeg2k", "truetype" ]
                   ]

main :: IO ()
main = portager (PortagerConfiguration { _arch = amd64 })
    [ "graphics" `with` pkgs [ inkscape, "media-gfx/gimp" ] ]

And corresponding world_sets file:

@graphics

Results in creation of following files:

==> package.accept_keywords/graphics <==
media-libs/libpng ~amd64

==> package.use/01graphics <==
app-text/poppler cairo
dev-python/pillow jpeg2k truetype
media-gfx/inkscape exif imagemagick

==> sets/graphics <==
media-gfx/inkscape
media-gfx/gimp

Once we get rid of inkscape:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Portager

main :: IO ()
main = portager (PortagerConfiguration { _arch = amd64 })
    [ "graphics" `with` pkgs [ "media-gfx/gimp" ] ]

It will result in creation of just a set file:

==> sets/graphics <==
media-gfx/gimp

Clear Separation of Configuration of Different Sets

Portager operates on level of sets. Set is a collection of atoms that can be requested to be installed by emerge. This can be made permanent by adding the set to a world sets file /var/lib/portage/world_sets.

This has a benefit that when you later on decide you don't need a set of packages anymore, you just get rid of it, with all useflag, keyword and license settings.

Similarly to global useflags defined by adding them to USE variable, you can define set global useflags in Portager (this results in appending the useflag to all atoms listed in a set, even those for which it is not valid).

Having following complete Portager configuration:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Portager

desktopMedia :: PortageR PackageSet
desktopMedia = "desktop-media" `with` do
    uses [ "X" ]
    pkgs [ "media-gfx/gpicview"
         , "media-video/vlc"
         ]

main :: IO ()
main = portager (PortagerConfiguration { _arch = amd64 }) [ desktopMedia ]

And corresponding world_sets file:

desktop-media

Results in creation of following files:

==> package.use/01desktop-media <==
media-gfx/gpicview X
media-video/vlc X

==> sets/desktop-media <==
media-gfx/gpicview
media-video/vlc

Atom media-gfx/gpicview has X useflag enabled even though it is not defined for the it.

Additional Functionality

Order of Sets Matters

The order of sets is important if you define overriding useflag settings.

Having following complete Portager configuration:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Portager

main :: IO ()
main = portager (PortagerConfiguration { _arch = amd64 })
    [ "console-tools" `with` pkgs ["app-editors/vim" `with` use ["-X"]]
    , "desktop-tools" `with` pkgs ["app-editors/vim" `with` use ["X"]]
    ]

And corresponding world_sets file (here order does not matter for Portager):

@console-tools
@desktop-tools

Results in creation of following files:

==> package.use/01console-tools <==
app-editors/vim -X

==> package.use/02desktop-tools <==
app-editors/vim X

==> sets/console-tools <==
app-editors/vim

==> sets/desktop-tools <==
app-editors/vim

If you ask emerge to install app-editors/vim it will be installed with X useflag enabled.


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the portager README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.