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Monthly Downloads: 20
Programming language: Haskell
License: MIT License
Tags: Database     Testing    
Latest version: v0.1.2

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README

Quokka

Is a small library that helps developers generate test data for the purpose of writing test/specs against their code which read and write data to the database.

[Quokka](quokka.jpg)

Limitations

This library currently makes some technical assumptions listed below. Some of these may be addressed in a future version.

  • This library only works with Postgres version 9.1+. It uses the Haskell postgresql-simple library.
  • It only works with tables that uses the Integer type for the primary key, and by virtue foreign keys which are based on the same type.
  • It also relies on schemas which follow certain conventions;
    • Primary keys in your database need to be of type Integer, and also need to be named Id.
    • Foreign keys need to be named using the convention tableName_id where tableName is the singular form of the table name. So for example if you have a users table and an accounts table, and the users table has a foreign key to the accounts table, then the foreign key in the accounts table needs to be named user_id.

Getting Started

To get started you will need to run the script ./bin/db-refresh, this script requires an up and running Postgres server which can be installed by following the steps below;

Postgres Install / Configure

OS-X

## install postgresql
brew install postgresql

## to initialize (once only)
initdb /usr/local/var/postgres -E utf8

## to start
pg_ctl -D /usr/local/var/postgres -l /usr/local/var/postgres/server.log start

## to stop
pg_ctl -D /usr/local/var/postgres stop -s -m fast

Setting up DB for tests.

./bin/db-refresh

Linux (Debian)

## install postgresql
apt-get install postgresql postgresql-client libpq-dev

# For the bin/db* scripts to work you have to setup your user to have superuser permissions
# Something like:

# Login as the default database user postgres
sudo -u postgres bash

# Start the client
psql

# Create a user with your username and set permissions
create user <your-username>;
alter role <your-username> with superuser;
alter user <your-username> with encrypted password '<password>';

Breakdown

If you are the type of person that feels reading documentation is a waste of time, then I highly recommend you look in the test folder of this project to learn how to use this particular library, otherwise please read on.

To get started with this library you need to define your ParentTable and ChildTable tables. The ParentTable type represents a table in your relational database that has no foreign keys, and has a primary key column named Id of type Integer. The ChildTable type is table in your relational database that has 1 or more foreign keys, and has a primary key column named Id of type Integer. As mentioned in the [Limitations](##Limitations) section foreign keys currently need to be named using a particular convention.

Here are few examples of how to define your tables;

userTable :: ParentTable
userTable = ParentTable "users" ["name", "age", "active"]

accountTableAsParent :: ParentTable
accountTableAsParent = ParentTable "accounts" ["name", "description"]

accountTableAsChild :: ChildTable
accountTableAsChild = ChildTable "accounts" ["name", "description"]

profileTable :: ChildTable
profileTable = ChildTable "profiles" ["active"]

As you can see from the example above the accounts table has been defined as both a parent table and child table. This is an example of how to represent as associative table (Table which represents a many to many relationship) using this library.

Populating Parent Tables

Once your tables are defined then you can define your functions which can take input data as a list of tuples which represent your data. Let's start with the users table. The following example demonstrates how to define a function to insert users, and then how to use this function;

insertUsers :: (ToRow q) => Connection -> [q] -> IO [Id]
insertUsers conn = build conn userTable

insertUsers conn [("John" :: Text, 40 :: Int, False :: Bool)
                 ,("Jane" :: Text, 32 :: Int, True :: Bool)]

The recommended pattern for setting this all up is to place such code in a factory to create the data.

Populating Child Tables

Populating child tables requires the resolution of foreign keys. Quokka derives relationships through the ParentTable type. This type captures the related table through the type thereby faciliating a mechanism through which child rows can be inserted into the table. The following example demonstrates how to define a function to insert child rows, and then how to use the function. This example builds on the last example;

insertAccounts :: (ToRow q) => Connection -> [q] -> IO [Id]
insertAccounts conn = buildWith1Rel conn userTable accountTableAsChild

userIds <- insertUsers conn [("John" :: Text, 40 :: Int, False :: Bool)]
accountIds <- insertAccounts conn [("Johns Account" :: Text, "Description" :: Text, id' userIds)]

The function id' is a helper function available in the library to extract the foreign key value of the parent entity when generating the insert statement for the database.

Custom Foreign Key Columns

When we use functions like buildWith1Rel Quokka relies on a simple convention when generating insert statements to populate foreign key columns. This convention will not suit all scenarios. For schemas which have foreign keys which do not follow convention Quokka comes with alternate functions such as buildWith1CustomRel. Let's look at a concrete example to better understand what we are saying. Let's take two tables users and accounts. If the accounts table has a foreign key named user_id to the users table then to populate both users and accounts we can use the function buildWith1Rel. But if the accounts table has a foreign key column named usersid then the function buildWith1Rel will fail as it will try to insert the foreign key into the column user_id. So in this case we use the function buildWith1CustomRel, this function takes a Relation as an argument. The Relation type takes the ParentTable and the FK type in its constructor, and we set the name of the foreign key column in the FK type.

Populating Associate Tables

Associate tables are a special case of child table with 2 foreign key associations. Populating associate tables requires the resolution of 2 foreign keys. Similar to child tables an associate table can be modelled using two ParentTable types and a single ChildTable type. This is illustrated in the example below which builds on the example from the [Populating Parent Tables](###Populating-Parent-Tables) section;

insertProfiles :: (ToRow q) => Connection -> [q] -> IO [Id]
insertProfiles conn = buildWithManyRels conn [userTable, accountTableAsParent] profileTable

userIds <- insertUsers conn [("John" :: Text, 40 :: Int, False :: Bool)]
accountIds <- insertAccounts conn [("Johns Account" :: Text, "Description" :: Text, id' userIds)]
profileIds <- insertProfiles conn [(True :: Bool, id' userIds, id' accountIds)]

buildWithManyRels in this case returns a Query type which is aware of the associative nature of profiles with users and accounts. So when we invoke the insertProfiles function the foreign key values are resolved during the insert. Quokka uses concrete types in a very restrictive way. So the definition of the Account child table cannot be used in the function call buildWithManyRels so we had to define the accounts table twice, once as ParentTable type, and once as a ChildTable type.

Insert Single Record

In the examples presented we see that even though we insert a single row the API treats everything as a collection. This can be a bit tiresome when we only want to insert one tuple. For this we have a whole series of functions that deal with a single record. For example to insert 1 single parent tuple with no relations we use the function build1 instead of build. Similarly to build a parent and child relationship with a single tuple you can use the build1With1Rel instead off the buildWith1Rel function so on and so forth.

License

MIT License

Copyright (c) 2019 Shirren Premaratne

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the quokka README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.