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Monthly Downloads: 22
Programming language: Haskell
License: BSD 3-clause "New" or "Revised" License
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README

Strapped Templates

General Purpose Templates in Haskell.

Objective

The objective of this project is to build an easy-to-use, flexible, general purpose templating language.

Strapped isn't necessarily geared towards HTML. For example, this README and cabal file is written in Strapped (see examples/templates/README.strp and examples/make_readme.hs).

As of 0.2 Strapped now accepts custom parsers and template tags as part of the StrappedConfig object.

Quick Start

Syntax

Strapped renders variables to text with this tag:

${ _ }

Strapped includes these tag blocks to control flow:

{$ inherits _ $} {$ let _ = _ $} {$ includes _ $} {$ for _ in _ $}{$ endfor $} {$ if _ $}{$ endif $} {% block _ $}{$ endblock $} {$ comment $}{$ endcomment $} {$ raw $}{$ endraw $}

Expressions

Strapped gives you a limited number of expressions you can define in your template. Improving this is a core focus of future releases.

Currently expressions include Bools, Lists, 0 arity functions, single arity functions, strings, ints, floats.

${ takesAList ["string", 1, 1.0, [True, zeroArityFunc, lookupVar], (someFunc False)] }

Example

Here is an example of the tags being used together:

{$ inherits base.strp $}

{$ isblock body $}

An IO function to find the current time: ${ ioTime }

{$ if is_truthy $}
    {$ inherits base.strp $}
    {$ isblock body $}
        Any block level can inherit from another template and override blocks.
    {$ endisblock $}
{$ else $}
    Don't show me.
{$ endif $}

Taken from an includes:
{$ include includes/includes.strp $}

Lets count...
{$ for i in is $}
    ${ i }
{$ endfor $}

{$ endisblock $}

Rendering

Strapped templates need two things to render. A TemplateStore and an InputBucket m.

TemplateStore is just function that take a String and returns a template.

InputBucket m is a list of maps that get iterated through to find variables.

The easiest way to create a template store is to use one of the built in functions. The templateStoreFromDirectory loads and parses the templates upfront. The TemplateStore datatype is flexible enough (executes in IO) that you could add a dynamically loading TemplateStore if you wanted.

import Control.Monad.IO.Class
import qualified Blaze.ByteString.Builder as B
import qualified Data.Text as T
import Data.Time

import Text.Strapped

makeBucket :: Integer -> InputBucket IO
makeBucket i = bucketFromList 
      [ ("is", lit $ map (LitInteger) [1..i])
      , ("is_truthy", lit i)
      , ("ioTime", Func (\_ -> (liftIO $ getCurrentTime) >>= (\c -> return $ LitText $ T.pack $ show c)))
      ]

main :: IO ()
main = do
  tmpls <- templateStoreFromDirectory defaultConfig "examples/templates" ".strp"
  case tmpls of
    Left err -> print err
    Right store -> do
      rendered <- render (putStore store defaultConfig) (makeBucket 2) "base_simple.strp"
      either (print) (print . B.toByteString) rendered

Template Lanaguage Features

Functions

Strapped lets you build and pass functions in your monad context.

A function takes a list of Literal and produces a Literal in an ErrorT m context.

instance Renderable UTCTime where
  renderOutput _ c = showToBuilder c

instance Renderable NominalDiffTime where
  renderOutput _ c = showToBuilder c

bucket = bucketFromList [
          ("ioTime", Func (\_ -> (liftIO $ getCurrentTime) >>= (\c -> return $ LitDyn $ c) )),
          ("diffTime", Func diffTime),
        ]

diffTime (LitList ((LitDyn a):(LitDyn b):_)) = do
  case do {t1 <- cast a; t2 <- cast b; return (t1, t2)} of
    Just (time1, time2) -> return $ LitDyn (diffUTCTime time1 time2)
    Nothing -> return $ LitText $ T.pack "Only UTCTimes Please..."
<h1>${ ioTime }<h1>
Diff ${ diffTime [ioTime, ioTime]}

Retults in:

<h1>2014-02-24 02:02:35.191664 UTC</h1>
Diff -0.000004s

For loops

For loops are easy to do:

bucket :: MonadIO m => InputBucket m
bucket = bucketFromList [
          ("is", List $ map (LitVal . LitInteger) [1..5]),
        ]
<ul>
  {$ for i in is $}
  <li> ${ i } </li>
  {$ endfor $}
</ul>

Parsing Control

You can use the {$ raw $} tag to prevent the parser from parsing a part of the file.

{$ raw $} ${ thisWontBeEvaluated } {$ endraw $}

Or you can use the {$ comment $} tag to skip over that part of the file altogether.

{$ comment $} This wont show. ${ thisWontShowAtAll } neither will this. {$ endcomment $}

In template declarations

At the start of every template, block, or forloop, you can define template variables with a let tag.

{$ let time = ioTime $}

${ time }

<ul>
  {$ for i in is $}
  {$ let val = someFunc i $}
  <li> ${ val } </li>
  {$ endfor $}
</ul>

Includes

You can easily include other templates.

includes.strp

Other Template
This is a template that calls another.
The other template: {$ include includes.strp $}

Result:

This is a template that calls another.
The other template: Other Template

Inheritance

Any block, forloop, or template can inherit from another template. This allows you to specify a base template with block tags that will get filled by content defined in isblock. If an inherits tag is encountered, only isblock tags will be allowed at that level.

base.strp

This is a base template
${ time }
{$ block title $} Default Title {$ endblock $}
{$ block body $} Default Body {$ endblock $}
{$ let time = ioTime $}
{$ inherits base.strp $}

{$ isblock title $}Block title!!{$ endisblock $}
{$ isblock title $}Block Body!!{$ endisblock $}

Here is an example of using inheritence at different levels:

{$ let time = ioTime $}

{$ inherits base.strp $}

{$ isblock title $}Outside of loop{$ endisblock $}

{$ isblock body $}
  {$ for i in is $}
    {$ inherits base.strp $}
    {$ isblock title $}Inside loop{$ endisblock $}
    {$ isblock body $}
      Called from for loop ${ i }
    {$ endisblock $}
  {$ endfor $}
{$ endisblock $}

Extending the template language with custom parsers and blocks

Strapped lets you define custom parsers to use to parse and render. You have to define both how to parse your data out of a template with Parsec and how to process it when it is rendered.

Theoretically this means you can build an entirely new template syntax within Strapped.


import Blaze.ByteString.Builder.Char8
import Data.Monoid ((<>))
import Data.Text as T
import Text.Strapped
import Text.Strapped.Render
import Text.Strapped.Parser
import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.String

data MyData = MyData ParsedExpression
    deriving (Show)

-- | Process MyData in the RenderT monad when it is rendered.
instance Block MyData where
    process (MyData ex) = do
        config <- getConfig
        lit <- reduceExpression ex
        return $ fromString "MyData ->" <> (renderOutput config lit) <> fromString "<- MyData"

-- | Parse out MyData using Parsec
parseMyData :: ParserM MyData
parseMyData = do
    tagStart >> spaces >> (string "MyData") >> spaces >> parseExpression (spaces >> tagEnd) >>= (return . MyData)

main :: IO ()
main = do

    case templateStoreFromList config [("mydata", "testing... {$ MyData lookup $}")] of
        Left e -> print e
        Right ts -> do
            r <- render (config {templateStore = ts}) (varBucket "lookup" $ LitVal $ LitText $ T.pack "Cooolio") "mydata"
            print r
    where config = defaultConfig {customParsers = [BlockParser parseMyData]}

Speed

Speed has taken a backseat to usability at this point in development.