Popularity
9.7
Growing
Activity
8.2
Declining
322
16
21

Monthly Downloads: 648
Programming language: Haskell
License: BSD 3-clause "New" or "Revised" License
Tags: Data     Parallelism     Data Structures    

massiv alternatives and similar packages

Based on the "Data" category

Do you think we are missing an alternative of massiv or a related project?

Add another 'Data' Package

README

massiv

massiv is a Haskell library for array manipulation. Performance is one of its main goals, thus it is capable of seamless parallelization of almost all of operations.

The name for this library comes from the Russian word Massiv (Масси́в), which means an Array.

Status

Language Travis Azure Coveralls Gitter.im
GitHub top language Travis Build Status Coverage Status Join the chat at https://gitter.im/haskell-massiv/Lobby
Package Hackage Nightly LTS
massiv Hackage Nightly Nightly
massiv-io Hackage Nightly Nightly
massiv-test Hackage Nightly Nightly
haskell-scheduler Hackage Nightly Nightly

Introduction

Everything in the library revolves around an Array r ix e - a data type family for anything that can be thought of as an array. The type variables, from the end, are:

  • e - element of an array.
  • ix - an index that will map to an actual element. The index must be an instance of the Index class with the default one being an Ix n type family and an optional being tuples of Ints.
  • r - underlying representation. The main representations are:

    • D - delayed array, which is simply a function from an index to an element: (ix -> e). Therefore indexing of this type of array is not possible, although elements can be computed with the evaluateAt function.
    • A few more extravagant delayed arrays, which are described in more depth in haddock: DI, DL and DW
    • P - Array with elements that are an instance of Prim type class, i.e. common Haskell primitive types: Int, Word, Char, etc. Backed by the usual ByteArray.
    • U - Unboxed arrays. The elements are instances of the Unbox type class. Just as fast as P, but has a wider range of data types that it can work with. Notable data types that can be stored as elements are Bool, tuples and Ix n.
    • S - Storable arrays. Backed by a pinned ByteArrays and elements are instances of the Storable type class.
    • B - Boxed arrays that don't have restrictions on their elements, since they are represented as pointers to elements, thus making them the slowest type of array, but also the most general. Arrays of this representation are element strict, in other words its elements are kept in Weak-Head Normal Form (WHNF).
    • N - Also boxed arrays, but unlike the other representation B, its elements are in Normal Form, i.e. in a fully evaluated state and no thunks or memory leaks are possible. It does require NFData instance for the elements though.
    • M - Manifest arrays, which is a general type of array that is backed by some memory representation, therefore any of the above P, U, S, B type of arrays can be converted to M in constant time with toManifest function. It is mostly useful during constant time slicing of manifest arrays, as this becomes the result representation. More on that in the slicing section.

Construct

Creating a delayed type of array allows us to fuse any future operation we decide to perform on it. Let's look at this example:

λ> import Data.Massiv.Array as A
λ> makeVectorR D Seq 10 id
Array D Seq (Sz1 10)
  [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ]

Here we created a delayed vector of size 10, which is in reality just an id function from its index to an element (see the Computation section for the meaning of Seq). So let's go ahead and square its elements

λ> vec = makeVectorR D Seq 10 id
λ> evaluate' vec 4
4
λ> vec2 = A.map (^ (2::Int)) vec
λ> evaluate' vec2 4
16

It's not that exciting, since every time we call evaluate' it will recompute the element, every time, therefore this function should be avoided at all costs. Instead we can use all of the functions that take Source like arrays and then fuse that computation together by calling compute, or a handy computeAs function and only afterwards apply an index' function or its synonym: (!). Any delayed array can also be reduced using one of the folding functions, thus completely avoiding any memory allocation, or converted to a list, if that's what you need:

λ> vec2U = computeAs U vec2
λ> vec2U
Array U Seq (Sz1 10)
  [ 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81 ]
λ> vec2U ! 4
16
λ> toList vec2U
[0,1,4,9,16,25,36,49,64,81]
λ> A.sum vec2U
285

There is a whole multitude of ways to construct arrays:

  • by using one of many helper functions: makeArray, range, rangeStepFrom, enumFromN, etc.
  • through conversion: from lists, from Vectors in vector library, from ByteStrings in bytestring;
  • with a help of mutable interface in PrimMonad (IO, ST, etc.), eg: makeMArray, generateArray, unfoldrPrim, etc.

It's worth noting that, in the next example, nested lists will be loaded into an unboxed manifest array and the sum of its elements will be computed in parallel on all available cores.

λ> A.sum (fromLists' Par [[0,0,0,0,0],[0,1,2,3,4],[0,2,4,6,8]] :: Array U Ix2 Double)
30.0

The above wouldn't run in parallel in ghci of course, as the program would have to be compiled with ghc using -threaded -with-rtsopts=-N flags in order to use all available cores. Alternatively we could do compile with the -threaded flag and then pass the number of capabilities directly to the runtime with +RTS -N<n>, where <n> is the number of cores you'd like to utilize.

Index

The main Ix n closed type family can be somewhat confusing, but there is no need to fully understand how it works in order to start using it. GHC might ask you for the DataKinds language extension if IxN n is used in a type signature, but there are type and pattern synonyms for the first five dimensions: Ix1, Ix2, Ix3, Ix4 and Ix5.

There are three distinguishable constructors for the index:

  • The first one is simply an int: Ix1 = Ix 1 = Int, therefore vectors can be indexed in a usual way without some extra wrapping data type, just as it was demonstrated in a previous section.
  • The second one is Ix2 for operating on 2-dimensional arrays and has a constructor :.
λ> makeArrayR D Seq (Sz (3 :. 5)) (\ (i :. j) -> i * j)
Array D Seq (Sz (3 :. 5))
  [ [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ]
  , [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
  , [ 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 ]
  ]
  • The third one is IxN n and is designed for working with N-dimensional arrays, and has a similar looking constructor :>, except that it can be chained indefinitely on top of :.
λ> arr3 = makeArrayR D Seq (Sz (3 :> 2 :. 5)) (\ (i :> j :. k) -> i * j + k)
λ> :t arr3
arr3 :: Array D (IxN 3) Int
λ> arr3
Array D Seq (Sz (3 :> 2 :. 5))
  [ [ [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
    , [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
    ]
  , [ [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
    , [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
    ]
  , [ [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
    , [ 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ]
    ]
  ]
λ> :t (10 :> 9 :> 8 :> 7 :> 6 :> 5 :> 4 :> 3 :> 2 :. 1)
λ> :t ix10
ix10 :: IxN 10
λ> ix10 -- 10-dimensional index
10 :> 9 :> 8 :> 7 :> 6 :> 5 :> 4 :> 3 :> 2 :. 1

Here is how we can construct a 4-dimensional array and sum its elements in constant memory:

λ> arr = makeArrayR D Seq (Sz (10 :> 20 :> 30 :. 40)) $ \ (i :> j :> k :. l) -> (i * j + k) * k + l
λ> :t arr -- a 4-dimensional array
arr :: Array D (IxN 4) Int
λ> A.sum arr
221890000

There are quite a few helper functions that can operate on indicies, but these are only needed when writing functions that work for arrays of arbitrary dimension, as such they are scarcely used:

λ> pullOutDim' ix10 5
(5,10 :> 9 :> 8 :> 7 :> 6 :> 4 :> 3 :> 2 :. 1)
λ> unconsDim ix10
(10,9 :> 8 :> 7 :> 6 :> 5 :> 4 :> 3 :> 2 :. 1)
λ> unsnocDim ix10
(10 :> 9 :> 8 :> 7 :> 6 :> 5 :> 4 :> 3 :. 2,1)

All of the Ix n indices are instances of Num so basic numeric operations are made easier:

λ> (1 :> 2 :. 3) + (4 :> 5 :. 6)
5 :> 7 :. 9
λ> 5 :: Ix4
5 :> 5 :> 5 :. 5

It is important to note that the size type is distinct from index by the newtype wrapper Sz ix. There is a constructor Sz, which will make sure that none of the dimensions are negative:

λ> Sz (2 :> 3 :. 4)
Sz (2 :> 3 :. 4)
λ> Sz (10 :> 2 :> -30 :. 4)
Sz (10 :> 2 :> 0 :. 4)

Same as with indicies, there are helper pattern synonyms: Sz1, Sz2, Sz3, Sz4 and Sz5.

λ> Sz3 2 3 4
Sz (2 :> 3 :. 4)
λ> Sz4 10 2 (-30) 4
Sz (10 :> 2 :> 0 :. 4)

As well as the Num instance:

λ> 4 :: Sz5
Sz (4 :> 4 :> 4 :> 4 :. 4)
λ> (Sz2 1 2) + 3
Sz (4 :. 5)
λ> (Sz2 1 2) - 3
Sz (0 :. 0)

Alternatively tuples of Ints can be used for working with Arrays, up to and including 5-tuples (type synonyms: Ix2T - Ix5T), but since tuples are polymorphic it is necessary to restrict the resulting array type:

λ> makeArray Seq (4, 20) (uncurry (*)) :: Array P Ix2T Int
(Array P Seq ((4,20))
  [ [ 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 ]
  , [ 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19 ]
  , [ 0,2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18,20,22,24,26,28,30,32,34,36,38 ]
  , [ 0,3,6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,36,39,42,45,48,51,54,57 ]
  ])
λ> :i Ix2T
type Ix2T = (Int, Int)

There are helper functions that can go back and forth between tuples and Ix n indices.

λ> fromIx4 (3 :> 4 :> 5 :. 6)
(3,4,5,6)
λ> toIx5 (3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
3 :> 4 :> 5 :> 6 :. 7

Slicing

In order to get a subsection of an array there is no need to recompute it, unless we want to free up the no longer memory, of course. So, there are a few slicing, resizing and extraction operators that can do it all in constant time, modulo the index manipulation:

λ> arr = makeArrayR U Seq (Sz (4 :> 2 :. 6)) fromIx3
λ> arr !> 3 !> 1
Array M Seq (Sz1 6)
  [ (3,1,0), (3,1,1), (3,1,2), (3,1,3), (3,1,4), (3,1,5) ]

As you might suspect all of the slicing, indexing, extracting, resizing operations are partial, and those are frowned upon in Haskell. So there are matching functions that can do the same operations safely by using MonadThrow and thus returning Nothing, Left SomeException or throwing an exception in case of IO on failure for example

λ> arr !?> 3 ??> 1
Array M Seq (Sz1 6)
  [ (3,1,0), (3,1,1), (3,1,2), (3,1,3), (3,1,4), (3,1,5) ]
λ> arr !?> 3 ??> 1 ??> 0 :: Maybe (Int, Int, Int)
Just (3,1,0)

In above examples we first take a slice at the 4th page (index 3, since we start at 0), then another one at the 2nd row (index 1). While in the last example we also take 1st element at position 0. Pretty neat, huh? Naturally, by doing a slice we always reduce dimension by one. We can do slicing from the outside as well as from the inside:

λ> 1 ... 10
Array D Seq (Sz1 10)
  [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ]
λ> a <- resizeM (Sz (3 :. 3)) $ 1 ... 10
λ> a
Array D Seq (Sz (3 :. 3))
  [ [ 1, 2, 3 ]
  , [ 4, 5, 6 ]
  , [ 7, 8, 9 ]
  ]
λ> a !> 0
Array D Seq (Sz1 3)
  [ 1, 2, 3 ]
λ> a <! 0
Array D Seq (Sz1 3)
  [ 1, 4, 7 ]
λ>

Or we can slice along any other available dimension:

λ> a <!> (2, 0)
Array D Seq (Sz1 3)
  [ 1, 2, 3 ]
λ> a <!> (1, 0)
Array D Seq (Sz1 3)
  [ 1, 4, 7 ]
λ> a <!> (1, 2)
Array D Seq (Sz1 3)
  [ 3, 6, 9 ]

In order to extract sub-array while preserving dimensionality we can use extract or extractFromTo.

λ> extractM 0 (Sz (1 :. 3)) a
Array D Seq (Sz (1 :. 3))
  [ [ 1, 2, 3 ]
  ]
λ> extractM 0 (Sz (3 :. 1)) a
Array D Seq (Sz (3 :. 1))
  [ [ 1 ]
  , [ 4 ]
  , [ 7 ]
  ]

Computation

There is a data type Comp that controls how elements will be computed when calling the compute function. It has a few constructors, although most of the time either Seq or Par will be sufficient:

  • Seq - computation will be done sequentially on one core (capability in ghc).
  • ParOn [Int] - perform computation in parallel while pinning the workers to particular cores. Providing an empty list will result in the computation being distributed over all available cores, or better known in Haskell as capabilities.
  • ParN Word16 - similar to ParOn, except it simply specifies the number of cores to use, with 0 meaning all cores.
  • Par - isn't really a constructor but a pattern for constructing ParOn [], which will result in Scheduler using all cores, thus should be used instead of ParOn.
  • Par' - similar to Par, except it uses ParN 0 underneath.

Just to make sure a simple novice mistake is prevented, which I have seen in the past, make sure your source code is compiled with ghc -O2 -threaded -with-rtsopts=-N, otherwise no parallelization and poor performance are waiting for you. Also a bit later you might notice the `{-# INLINE funcName

-}` pragma being used, often times it is a good idea to do that, but not always required. It is

worthwhile to benchmark and experiment.

Stencil

Instead of manually iterating over a multidimensional array and applying a function to each element, while reading its neighboring elements (as you would do in an imperative language) in a functional language it is much more efficient to apply a stencil function and let the library take care of all of bounds checking and iterating in a cache friendly manner.

What's a stencil? It is a declarative way of specifying a pattern for how elements of an array in a neighborhood will be used in order to update each element of that array. In massiv a Stencil is a function that can read the neighboring elements of the stencil's center (the zero index), and only those, and then outputs a new value for the center element.

[stencil](massiv-examples/files/stencil.png)

Let's create a simple, but somewhat meaningful array and create an averaging stencil. There is nothing particular about the array itself, but the filter is a stencil that sums the elements in a Moore neighborhood and divides the result by 9, i.e. finds the average of a 3 by 3 square.

arrLightIx2 :: Comp -> Sz Ix2 -> Array D Ix2 Double
arrLightIx2 comp arrSz = makeArray comp arrSz $ \ (i :. j) -> sin (fromIntegral (i * i + j * j))
{-# INLINE arrLightIx2 #-}

average3x3Filter :: (Default a, Fractional a) => Stencil Ix2 a a
average3x3Filter = makeStencil (Sz (3 :. 3)) (1 :. 1) $ \ get ->
  (  get (-1 :. -1) + get (-1 :. 0) + get (-1 :. 1) +
     get ( 0 :. -1) + get ( 0 :. 0) + get ( 0 :. 1) +
     get ( 1 :. -1) + get ( 1 :. 0) + get ( 1 :. 1)   ) / 9
{-# INLINE average3x3Filter #-}

Here is what it would look like in GHCi. We create a delayed array with some funky periodic function, and make sure it is computed prior to mapping an average stencil over it:

λ> arr = computeAs U $ arrLightIx2 Par (Sz (600 :. 800))
λ> :t arr
arr :: Array U Ix2 Double
λ> :t mapStencil Edge average3x3Filter arr
mapStencil Edge average3x3Filter arr :: Array DW Ix2 Double

As you can see, that operation produced an array of some weird representation DW, which stands for Delayed Windowed array. In its essence DW is an array type that does no bounds checking in order to gain performance, except when it's near the border, where it uses a border resolution technique supplied by the user (Edge in the example above). Currently it is used only in stencils and not much else can be done to an array of this type besides further computing it into a manifest representation.

This example will be continued in the next section, but before that I would like to mention that some might notice that it looks very much like convolution, and in fact convolution can be implemented with a stencil. There is a helper function makeConvolutionStencil that lets you do just that. For the sake of example we'll do a sum of all neighbors by hand instead:

sum3x3Filter :: Fractional a => Stencil Ix2 a a
sum3x3Filter = makeConvolutionStencil (Sz (3 :. 3)) (1 :. 1) $ \ get ->
  get (-1 :. -1) 1 . get (-1 :. 0) 1 . get (-1 :. 1) 1 .
  get ( 0 :. -1) 1 . get ( 0 :. 0) 1 . get ( 0 :. 1) 1 .
  get ( 1 :. -1) 1 . get ( 1 :. 0) 1 . get ( 1 :. 1) 1
{-# INLINE sum3x3Filter #-}

There is not a single plus or multiplication sign, that is because convolutions is actually summation of elements multiplied by a kernel element, so instead we have composition of functions applied to an offset index and a multiplier. After we map that stencil, we can further divide each element of the array by 9 in order to get the average. Yeah, I lied a bit, Array DW ix is an instance of Functor class, so we can map functions over it, which will be fused as with a regular Delayed array:

computeAs U $ fmap (/9) $ mapStencil Edge sum3x3Filter arr

If you are still confused of what a stencil is, but you are familiar with Conway's Game of Life this should hopefully clarify it a bit more. The function life below is a single iteration of Game of Life:

lifeRules :: Word8 -> Word8 -> Word8
lifeRules 0 3 = 1
lifeRules 1 2 = 1
lifeRules 1 3 = 1
lifeRules _ _ = 0

lifeStencil :: Stencil Ix2 Word8 Word8
lifeStencil = makeStencil (Sz (3 :. 3)) (1 :. 1) $ \ get ->
  lifeRules <$> get (0 :. 0) <*>
  (get (-1 :. -1) + get (-1 :. 0) + get (-1 :. 1) +
   get ( 0 :. -1)         +         get ( 0 :. 1) +
   get ( 1 :. -1) + get ( 1 :. 0) + get ( 1 :. 1))

life :: Array S Ix2 Word8 -> Array S Ix2 Word8
life = compute . mapStencil Wrap lifeStencil

<!-- TODO: add a gif with a few iterations -->

The full working example that uses GLUT and OpenGL is located in [GameOfLife](massiv-examples/GameOfLife/app/GameOfLife.hs)

massiv-io

In order to do anything useful with arrays we need to be able to read some data from a file. Considering that most common array-like files are images, [massiv-io](massiv-io) provides an interface to read, write and display images in common formats using Haskell native JuicyPixels and Netpbm packages.

There is also a variety of colorspaces (or rather color models) and pixel types that are currently included in this package, which will likely find a separate home in the future, but for now we can ignore those colorspaces and pretend that Pixel is some magic wrapper around numeric values that this package is capable of reading/writing.

The previous example wasn't particularly interesting, since we couldn't visualize what is actually going on, so let's expend on it:

import Data.Massiv.Array
import Data.Massiv.Array.IO

main :: IO ()
main = do
  let arr = computeAs S $ arrLightIx2 Par (600 :. 800)
      toImage ::
           (Functor (Array r Ix2), Load r Ix2 (Pixel Y' Word8))
        => Array r Ix2 Double
        -> Image S Y' Word8
      toImage = computeAs S . fmap (PixelY' . toWord8)
      lightPath = "files/light.png"
      lightAvgPath = "files/light_avg.png"
      lightSumPath = "files/light_sum.png"
  writeImage lightPath $ toImage $ delay arr
  putStrLn $ "written: " ++ lightPath
  writeImage lightAvgPath $ toImage $ mapStencil Edge average3x3Filter arr
  putStrLn $ "written: " ++ lightAvgPath

massiv-examples/vision/files/light.png:

[Light](massiv-examples/vision/files/light.png)

massiv-examples/vision/files/light_avg.png:

[Light](massiv-examples/vision/files/light_avg.png)

The full example is in the [vision](massiv-examples/vision/app/AvgSum.hs) package and if you have stack installed you can run it as:

$ cd massiv-examples/vision && stack build && stack exec -- avg-sum

Other libraries

A natural question might come to mind: Why even bother with a new array library when we already have a few really good ones in the Haskell world? The main reasons for me are performance and usability. I personally felt like there was much room for improvement even before I started work on this package, and it seems as it turned out to be true. For example, the most common goto library for dealing with multidimensional arrays and parallel computation is Repa, which I personally was a big fan of for quite some time, to the point that I even wrote a Haskell Image Processing library based on top of it.

Here is a quick summary of how massiv compares to Repa so far:

  • Better scheduler, that is capable of handling nested parallel computation.
  • Also shape polymorphic, but with improved default indexing data types.
  • Safe stencils for arbitrary dimensions, not only 2D convolution. Stencils are composable through an instance of Applicative
  • Improved performance on almost all operations.
  • Structural parallel folds (i.e. left/right - direction is preserved)
  • Super easy slicing.
  • Delayed arrays aren't indexable, only Manifest are (saving user from common pitfall in Repa of trying to read elements of delayed array)

As far as usability of the library goes, it is very subjective, thus I'll let you be a judge of that. When talking about performance it is the facts that do matter. Thus, let's not continue this discussion in pure abstract words, below is a glimpse into benchmarks against Repa library running with GHC 8.2.2 on Intel® Core™ i7-3740QM CPU @ 2.70GHz × 8

Stencil example discussed earlier:

Benchmark convolve-seq: RUNNING...
benchmarking Stencil/Average/Massiv Parallel
time                 6.859 ms   (6.694 ms .. 7.142 ms)
                     0.994 R²   (0.986 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 6.640 ms   (6.574 ms .. 6.757 ms)
std dev              270.6 μs   (168.3 μs .. 473.4 μs)
variance introduced by outliers: 18% (moderately inflated)

benchmarking Stencil/Average/Repa Parallel
time                 39.36 ms   (38.33 ms .. 40.58 ms)
                     0.997 R²   (0.993 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 38.15 ms   (37.18 ms .. 39.03 ms)
std dev              1.951 ms   (1.357 ms .. 2.454 ms)
variance introduced by outliers: 13% (moderately inflated)

Sum over an array with a left fold:

Benchmark fold-seq: RUNNING...
benchmarking Sum (1600x1200)/Sequential/Massiv Ix2 U
time                 1.860 ms   (1.850 ms .. 1.877 ms)
                     1.000 R²   (0.999 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 1.869 ms   (1.861 ms .. 1.886 ms)
std dev              35.77 μs   (20.65 μs .. 62.14 μs)

benchmarking Sum (1600x1200)/Sequential/Vector U
time                 1.690 ms   (1.686 ms .. 1.694 ms)
                     1.000 R²   (1.000 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 1.686 ms   (1.679 ms .. 1.692 ms)
std dev              20.98 μs   (16.14 μs .. 27.77 μs)

benchmarking Sum (1600x1200)/Sequential/Repa DIM2 U
time                 40.02 ms   (38.05 ms .. 42.81 ms)
                     0.993 R²   (0.987 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 38.40 ms   (38.03 ms .. 39.44 ms)
std dev              1.225 ms   (303.9 μs .. 2.218 ms)

benchmarking Sum (1600x1200)/Parallel/Massiv Ix2 U
time                 751.3 μs   (744.1 μs .. 758.7 μs)
                     0.998 R²   (0.997 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 750.7 μs   (741.7 μs .. 762.3 μs)
std dev              32.13 μs   (19.02 μs .. 50.21 μs)
variance introduced by outliers: 34% (moderately inflated)

benchmarking Sum (1600x1200)/Parallel/Repa DIM2 U
time                 9.581 ms   (9.415 ms .. 9.803 ms)
                     0.994 R²   (0.988 R² .. 0.998 R²)
mean                 9.085 ms   (8.871 ms .. 9.281 ms)
std dev              584.2 μs   (456.4 μs .. 800.4 μs)
variance introduced by outliers: 34% (moderately inflated)

Benchmark fold-seq: FINISH

Further resources on learning massiv: